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Hangman

Geography

Sport





Easy

  • 14

    86

    2017/10/10

    bojan

  • 13

    70

    2017/10/10

    - country -

  • 13

    69

    2017/10/11

    - country -

  • 13

    66

    2017/10/10

    uros86

  • 11

    57

    2017/10/16

    - game -

  • 9

    42

    2017/10/16

    uros86

  • 9

    36

    2017/10/16

    uros86

  • 8

    56

    2017/10/11

    uros86

  • 8

    44

    2017/10/16

    uros86

Normal

  • 26

    192

    2017/10/17

    ficfiric

  • 19

    114

    2017/10/17

    uros86

  • 14

    90

    2017/10/19

    uros86

  • 12

    89

    2017/10/18

    uros86

  • 11

    86

    2017/10/19

    uros86

  • 11

    55

    2017/10/10

    uros86

  • 11

    53

    2017/10/13

    uros86

  • 11

    53

    2017/10/13

    uros86

  • 11

    46

    2017/10/16

    - free -

Hard

  • 35

    277

    2017/01/29

    - free -

  • 32

    253

    2017/01/30

    - country -

  • 26

    195

    2016/02/06

    ficfiric

  • 24

    204

    2017/10/02

    - country -

  • 24

    191

    2017/01/27

    - hangman -

  • 24

    178

    2016/02/10

    - hangman -

  • 22

    176

    2017/02/09

    - online -

  • 22

    172

    2017/01/27

    - online -

  • 21

    168

    2017/01/27

    - capital city -

About Hangman

Hangman is a paper and pencil guessing game for two or more players. One player thinks of a word, phrase or sentence and the other tries to guess it by suggesting letters or numbers, within a certain number of guesses.

The word to guess is represented by a row of dashes, representing each letter of the word. In most variants, proper nouns, such as names, places, and brands, are not allowed. Slang words, sometimes referred to as informal or shortened words, are also not allowed. If the guessing player suggests a letter which occurs in the word, the other player writes it in all its correct positions. If the suggested letter or number does not occur in the word, the other player draws one element of a hanged man stick figure as a tally mark.

The player guessing the word may, at any time, attempt to guess the whole word. If the word is correct, the game is over and the guesser wins. Otherwise, the other player may choose to penalize the guesser by adding an element to the diagram. On the other hand, if the other player makes enough incorrect guesses to allow his opponent to complete the diagram, the game is also over, this time with the guesser losing. However, the guesser can also win by guessing all the letters or numbers that appears in the word, thereby completing the word, before the diagram is completed.

History

"The origins of Hangman are obscure meaning not discovered, but it seems to have arisen in Victorian times," says Tony Augarde, author of The Oxford Guide to Word Games. The game is mentioned in Alice Bertha Gomme's "Traditional Games" in 1894 under the name "Birds, Beasts and Fishes." The rules are simple; a player writes down the first and last letters of a word and another player guesses the letters in between. In other sources,[where?] the game is called "Gallows", "The Game of Hangin", or "Hanger".

Strategy

The fact that the twelve most commonly occurring letters in the English language are e-t-a-o-i-n-s-h-r-d-l-u (from most to least), along with other letter-frequency lists, are used by the guessing player to increase the odds when it is their turn to guess. On the other hand, the same lists can be used by the puzzle setter to stump their opponent by choosing a word which deliberately avoids common letters (e.g. rhythm or zephyr) or one that contains rare letters (e.g. jazz).

Another common strategy is to guess vowels first, as English only has five vowels (a, e, i, o, and u, while y may sometimes, but rarely, be used as a vowel) and almost every word has at least one.

Hangman's Most Difficult Word

Hangman — a short, easy to play game: all one needs is a pencil, piece of paper, and a friend. A staple of bored school children everywhere, the game has origins dating back to the late 1900s.

But what's the hardest word to guess?

Jon McLoone built a computer game — with a series of algorithms — to figure out that exact question. It rests on a key assumption: the guesser will pick common letters (e.g. vowels) measurably and proportionally more often than exceptionally rare ones (Q, X, Z, J). McLoone then simulated fifty Hangman runs for every single word in the dictionary. That's 90,000 words, totaling nearly 5 million games on Hangman.

Some words were easily guessed, typically requiring fewer than five incorrect letters offered. For example, the word "difficult" proved easy — in its 50 trials, the simulator guessed, on average, only 3.3 incorrect letters. Allowing for eight incorrect ones before our stick figure meets an untimely death, the word "difficult" only caused one stick-death. Allowing for ten? Mr. Stick had a 100% survival rate.

Having gathered all this data on 90,000 words, McLoone selected the 1,000 most promising, and then ran the game 3,000 times using just those thousand. All said and done, McLoone "played" nearly 8 million games of Hangman in order to determine that the hardest Hangman word to guess — regardless of whether the guesser has 8, 9, 10, or even up to 13 guesses, is "jazz."

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